“Harvest Meal at School” at the May 16 Open House “Harvest Meal at School” at the May 16 Open House

  • Wed May 14th, 2008 8:00am
  • News

Farm-to-Cafeteria is putting together a community dinner, called “Harvest Meal at School,” that will happen for the first time on March 16 at the Orcas Island School Open House.

“Harvest Meal at School” was inspired by an similar event at the Lopez School where local chefs prepare a menu for the community from fresh, organic, locally grown food. It is served in the school cafeteria and the entire community is invited. In their words, “It is a way to share the joy of local food with the whole community, strengthen the local food system, and honor the school and its cafeteria staff.”

“A young man and resident of Orcas Island named Owen Cheevers brought the idea to us a few months ago with the fervent hope that we could do something similar here on Orcas. The Open House on May 16 presented the perfect time and opportunity,” says Farm-to-Cafeteria advocate, Madie Murray.

The first Harvest Meal on Orcas will be prepared by local chefs Annie Sparks-Dempster (former Chez Chloe chef) and Charles Dalton of The Kitchen located behind Tres Fabu. The menu has been determined based on available crops at the time, and promises to be delicious. It will consist of fresh greens, a main entrée of vegetarian or beef lasagna, garlic bread, a scrumptious surprise dessert and drinks (coffee, tea, or water.) The meal will be offered at $5 for adults and $2 for children 12 and under. Additional donations toward making it an ongoing event will also be welcome. It will be open to all in the community who wish to come to the school cafeteria between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. The meal will be served “cafeteria style,” in the same manner and venue the school kids experience every day. “We are prepared to serve up to 150 people, so I would advise you to come early!” Murray suggests.

The entire event is for the benefit of the Farm-to-Cafeteria effort, and proceeds received that evening will go back into the program for future events, help raise funds to support the school cafeteria needs, and promote the use of more local foods in the public school lunch menu.

“I can’t tell you how energized those of us involved are in making this a truly meaningful experience,” says Cheevers. “We sincerely appreciate how the school is embracing our efforts, and we’re hoping it will become a regular event.” The group is gearing up for it to become at least a seasonal event with each season’s crops being celebrated in the menu, and perhaps a monthly event in the future.

Farm-to-Cafeteria is putting together a community dinner, called “Harvest Meal at School,” that will happen for the first time on March 16 at the Orcas Island School Open House.

“Harvest Meal at School” was inspired by an similar event at the Lopez School where local chefs prepare a menu for the community from fresh, organic, locally grown food. It is served in the school cafeteria and the entire community is invited. In their words, “It is a way to share the joy of local food with the whole community, strengthen the local food system, and honor the school and its cafeteria staff.”

“A young man and resident of Orcas Island named Owen Cheevers brought the idea to us a few months ago with the fervent hope that we could do something similar here on Orcas. The Open House on May 16 presented the perfect time and opportunity,” says Farm-to-Cafeteria advocate, Madie Murray.

The first Harvest Meal on Orcas will be prepared by local chefs Annie Sparks-Dempster (former Chez Chloe chef) and Charles Dalton of The Kitchen located behind Tres Fabu. The menu has been determined based on available crops at the time, and promises to be delicious. It will consist of fresh greens, a main entrée of vegetarian or beef lasagna, garlic bread, a scrumptious surprise dessert and drinks (coffee, tea, or water.) The meal will be offered at $5 for adults and $2 for children 12 and under. Additional donations toward making it an ongoing event will also be welcome. It will be open to all in the community who wish to come to the school cafeteria between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. The meal will be served “cafeteria style,” in the same manner and venue the school kids experience every day. “We are prepared to serve up to 150 people, so I would advise you to come early!” Murray suggests.

The entire event is for the benefit of the Farm-to-Cafeteria effort, and proceeds received that evening will go back into the program for future events, help raise funds to support the school cafeteria needs, and promote the use of more local foods in the public school lunch menu.

“I can’t tell you how energized those of us involved are in making this a truly meaningful experience,” says Cheevers. “We sincerely appreciate how the school is embracing our efforts, and we’re hoping it will become a regular event.” The group is gearing up for it to become at least a seasonal event with each season’s crops being celebrated in the menu, and perhaps a monthly event in the future.